Tuesday, April 17, 2007

Blossom and Bells

cherry blossom

Returning from our blossom walk, I set a table in the vines looking out towards the white orchard, the trees like fluffy wedding dresses on golden puddles of spring flowers. The village bell sounded nine in the distance.

I laid out my working tools: A score of a Haydn quartet, a pencil, and some Badois.

Suddenly I realised there was sobbing emerging from the kitchen, and when I re-entered I saw that this article about another kind of bell had had quite an effect on Julian.

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7 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Isn't this an amazing story? We wish we had been at the metro stop that morning!

11:28 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To our shame, Americans make a living. We don't choose to have a life. Unless, like some of us, we wake up and choose joie de vivre before it's too late.

6:49 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

People are touched by different things. Many are not moved by the same music as others, or writing, or visual beauty - but they might be by the helping hand of a neighbour, or the love of a friend. The joys of your local red may be lost on a migraine-sufferer, who nevertheless may have the freshness of palate to enjoy the subtlety of a truffle omelette.

I'd love to know whether those people scurrying past Joshua Bell might have stopped for something else ...

7:50 PM  
Blogger Robyn Sinclair said...

I wondered what could make an Englishman cry. Now I understand.

2:22 PM  
Anonymous darci said...

"$32 and change"
i remember, years ago, on my way out west, my (then) boyfriend and i stopped over in new orleans and as we paid the meter a man greeted us, his voice swirled inside a plastic drum as he banged out the beats--he sang about my curly hair and smiling eyes, then thanked us and walked away, never asking for a cent. we stood there, silenced.

over a block away we chased him down handing over the only cash we had, a mere five bucks. he refused, but we insisted. we could have never paid him enough, that performance carried us across texas, and much, much farther.

7:38 PM  
Blogger Bitterroot said...

Thank you for this link, Ruth. It was very interesting and more than a little sad.

10:47 PM  
Blogger calm.cool.collected said...

I heard a snippet of the Bell story on the news...so glad I got to read it in its entirety. This is why I love to travel to Europe...to remind me to live life and to enjoy the little moments. Most of us rush too much in America. I think I will add the Post article to my favorites and read it next time I need a reminder of the good life. Thanks!

7:57 AM  

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